Tag Archives: fire

Ebola Vehicle DECON

Ebola apparently is everywhere is the world these days, and it does not discriminate. It cares not about race, age or the physical size of its host. It simply wants to spread freely and make the daily headlines all around the globe.
My oldest son who attends middle school watched a video today about Ebola and its origins, my elementary school son, well, he just watches it on the television and reads the headlines…….the radio is also broadcasting about the victims, the EMS workers, nurses and airplane travel and this diseases incessant desire to spread.

Vehicle Decontamination System

Living in Orlando, Florida with an International Airport just miles away, I wonder how quickly Ebola will take to arrive here. Customs won’t stop it, the TSA is helpless and the police, nah…..once it sneaks in, its here for the long haul. Now don’t let this panic you, the big pharmacy companies are promising a drug, a cure, a miracle on its way. The million dollar question is, who will it be made available to first? Can I get it, can your kids, your pets? Only time will tell, but I think it will be a long time before the PILL becomes readily available…..I hope I’m wrong.

Ronald Brown

The one certainty is that once Ebola makes its way into the Sunshine state, it will spread quickly, of this I am positive. Patients will have to be transported to safe zones, quarantine areas and wherever else the City decides to house them. It wont be fun……..scary yes, but fun, NO! Healthcare workers who were already wearing their PPE (Personal protection equipment) have now been diagnosed….so what of the man on the street who has the perfect exposure risk made available?

Moving forward—The Winter Park Fire/Rescue organization, a nearby city of Orlando, now has three ambulances equipped with self contained, built-in decontamination units – coming in the wake of an international Ebola virus scare. The units feature pressurized pumps, which release a decontamination mist inside the patient area of the ambulance. It takes about 15 minutes for the mist to cover all the surface area inside and break the chain of infection. Initially built for another service, this process will hopefully set the standard for rescue and emergency medical workers who travel to areas where contamination is possible.
It’s inventor, AeroClave founder Dr. Ronald Brown, recently showed me the testing methods of his built in decontamination unit, at his office in Winter Park, Florida. Viruses with similar characteristics to Ebola have been tested with positive results that show the pathogens are erased. A small disk which contains spores is placed throughout the vehicle, inside of gear bags and drawers, and then misted. The disk is taken out after the process has been completed and then tested to see if the spores were killed. In all the cases he showed me, they were. Everyday AeroClave is bringing in city and county vehicles from other agencies to “clean them out”. If it is currently available, why haven’t I heard about other states trying to benefit from this service? Are they tone deaf, don’t read social media, broke, or just scared to call….

Ronald Brown

I surely hope this process and his installed units gain some followers in the near future. I for one, would feel much safer traveling in the back of an ambulance that I know was decontaminated after the last medical call had ended. I don’t know who was in the back of the truck prior to me. I’m sure the workers themselves would also feel much safer knowing that they can mist the back of the ambulance after every call. I for one, enjoy coming home to my boys every night, and surely don’t want the Ebola virus to come calling unexpectedly.

Images available at APImages.com Search VEHICLE DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM AlexMenendez.com

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Scout night at the Zoo

The gang upon arrival, before football took over.

The gang upon arrival, before football took over.

Last evening both boys had the opportunity to attend the “Wild Night” boy scouts campout event at the Sanford Zoo. Both dens attended and the turnout was pretty good considering this would be a fairly short event.

Scouts and their families were to arrive at 4:00 on Saturday night, setup tents and the campground, then be prepared to meet our Zoo tour-guides at 7pm. Since the daylight savings time clock change happened a few weeks ago, it was fairly dark by 6:00, but that did not deter the 7 footballs that were flying between the trees and bouncing off the tents. These boys were non-stop and all roaring to go, especially since none of them has to return to school for at least another week……at this point, I was beginning to prepare for a long night!

Scouts had to test their red gels to make sure that they were not too bright to scare the nocturnal animals.

Scouts had to test their red gels to make sure that they were not too bright to scare the nocturnal animals.

Our guides arrived at 6:45 and gave instructions on what to do, and what NOT to do. We would be split up into 5 individual groups, and would be getting a 90-minute tour of the actual zoo. Everyone that carried a flashlight had to have a red colored gel affixed to their lights, as to not disturb or blind the wildlife. These gels were doled out and tested by our guides….then we were off in search of wild beasts and hissing insects.

A zoo volunteer shows a deadly scorpion that stirs in the nighttime hours.

A zoo volunteer shows a deadly scorpion that stirs in the nighttime hours.

Each group stopped at predetermined check points and saw such critters as scorpions, owls, Madagascar hissing roaches, alligators, porcupines, cougars and a fully loaded bat house. The time passed fairly quickly, and then it was back to camp.

Zane cutting the American Flag prior to its retirement.

Zane cutting the American Flag prior to its retirement.

We met up under the fan covered meeting spot which featured at least a dozen picnic tables, a few of which were strewn with old and tattered US flags.  Tonights lesson/activity would be to teach the boys (and a few visiting girls), how to properly retire a worn or tattered US flag.  The process begins with cutting out the blue patch with the stars, and then meticulously cutting the red and white stripes into individual ribbons or strips.

The flag ceremony around the fire.

The flag ceremony around the fire.

One of the US flags gets retired in accordance to the Scout manual.

One of the US flags gets retired in accordance to the Scout manual.

Fireside, a few small words were spoken by the parents and scouts, and the flag segments were placed into the fire, in order.  At this point, the flames grew taller than most of the kids that were surrounding it, and the heat radiated at least 30 feet from its popping and cracking center.  In a matter of minutes, the fire was back down to its normal size with no trace of the flags, and the group was off for banana pudding.

A :30 timelapse as the clouds were moving in, the orange is from the City of Sanford light pollution.

A :30 timelapse as the clouds were moving in, the orange is from the City of Sanford light pollution.

The clouds slowly moved in and at 11pm and there were still youngsters running through camp, screaming and giggling as little boys do…..!

Blaze, my 10 year old, decided that we should shoot some long exposure images before the clouds totally blocked out the stars that we could still see. We filmed for about 30 minutes and he lightpainted the bottom of both palm and oak trees…..nothing too spectacular came to us, but just being out there with him made the entire trip worthwhile!

A :30 timelapse as the clouds were moving in, the orange is from the City of Sanford light pollution.

A :30 timelapse as the clouds were moving in, the orange is from the City of Sanford light pollution.

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